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Gospel Music Critic Anthony Heilbut Says Many Gospel Artists Were Gay, Mean and Conniving

gay gospel artist

Gospel Music Critic Anthony Heilbut Says Many Gospel Artists Were Gay, Mean and Conniving

We were alerted by a faithful AT2W reader about an article that stresses the ‘gospel view’ of the black church and gay gospel artists and musicians’ contribution to gospel music as an industry.

The author of  ‘The Children and their Secret Closet’ which is an essay in his new book, “The Fan Who Knew Too Much” is a Jewish atheist, Anthony Heilbut yet his views of the black church and gay gospel artists in some ways may parallel with our facts and views.

We have touched on this subject many times and in our very popular three part series, “How Gay Gospel Artists Left a Tainted Legacy for Today’s Generation“. It is a known fact that gays have paid a huge contribution to the gospel music industry and in the black church music overall.

gay gospel artist, tonex, blslade

Heilbut states, as we did, that the gospel world is complex, paradoxical and contradictory. He says that the gospel artists in the black church were not ‘saint-like’. In fact, he states in his essay that the gay gospel artists could be vulgar, mean, conniving, petty, selfish and unkind, reported by Huffington Post. While we can see, according to Heilbut that the gay gospel artists are tragically flawed yet human. He even goes in on Mahaila Jackson. We all know her as a very saintly woman and most people have never had a bad word to say about her but longtime gospel insider, writer, record producer Heilbut reveals another side of her. In his ‘The Gospel Sound’ e states that Mahaila Jackson was ‘notoriously stingy and cursed like a sailor.

How Gay Gospel Artists Left a Tainted Legacy for Today’s Generation, Part 1, Part 2 and Part 3

gay gospel artist

Heilbut says the gays in black church were gospel artists such as Sam Cooke, Sister Rosetta Tharpe, Alex Bradford and James Cleveland and they were known to be gay or “queer.” He identified a time when black churches were considered safe spaces for “the children,” (the gays in the church) and a time when gays and lesbians sought and found refuge in churches that not only acknowledged their presence but also their value.  He says gays were drawn to the church’s territory of gospel music which was considered a ‘saving role’ within the church. They were the most faithful members of the black church and celebrants of the worship culture.

Well, if you haven’t read our series “How Gay Gospel Artists Left a Tainted Legacy for Today’s Generation, Part 1, Part 2 and Part 3